Business Spotlight

Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave

Posted by AC Team - on Friday, 06 January 2012

Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave
If you know Rain, BoA (shown left), and Sistar, then you already know K-Pop, Korea’s contemporary pop music and its artists. K-Pop music is one of the fastest growing music genres in the world, and along with Korea’s popular TV drama serials, films and comic books are a growing source of export revenue for Korea.   The growing global fan base of Korea's entertainment and cultural offerings, known as "Hallyu" or the "Korean Wave" feels more like a tidal wave in some...

Business

The Uses for US $1

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 20 December 2006

The children came in groups of tens, twenties, thirties, forties and fifties. They came on foot on the hard packed potholed dirt roads, the older ones, ages eight or nine, holding the hands of the younger ones. Many of them walked barefoot the several kilometers from the eleven villages around Nandi Hills, Bangalore rural district, India to the HH Sai Maa Health Centre, as they owned no shoes. There are no buses nor could they have afforded to take one. They came with their teachers, smiling and eager to get some needed medicine and vitamins and to learn about health and hygiene.

The children came in groups of tens, twenties, thirties, forties and fifties. They came on foot on the hard packed potholed dirt roads, the older ones, ages eight or nine, holding the hands of the younger ones. Many of them walked barefoot the several kilometers from the eleven villages around Nandi Hills, Bangalore rural district, India to the HH Sai Maa Health Centre, as they owned no shoes. There are no buses nor could they have afforded to take one. They came with their teachers, smiling and eager to get some needed medicine and vitamins and to learn about health and hygiene.

The children streamed in until the brick and cement hall was packed with over a thousand thin small bodies, all sitting quietly on the cool cement floor, wide eyed in anticipation of what we may share with them. Tears welled up in my eyes as I looked at the sea of expectant, upturned little faces. I could feel their hope and trust along with their unquestioning acceptance of what is. Turning to my colleagues, I can see that they too are overwhelmed. We are awed by the magnitude of the challenge and encouraged by the potential we have to make a difference in so many young lives.

We have come, a collaboration of four organizations, Us Foundation www.usfoundation.org , Airline Ambassadors International www.airlineamb.org, Humanity in Unity www.humanityinunity.org and Vitamin Angels...

The Future of Wireless is Here - and Its in Asia

Posted by Mike Kai on Thursday, 31 August 2006

If you think your new camera phone is hot, just wait until you see the next generation of cell phones.

Do you have a 5 mega pixel camera built into your cell phone, combined with a TV tuner and an MP3? We reported that back in 2004.

Many believe that the new camera/video/TV tuner/MP3 phones now coming on to the market just in time for the holidays, are just the beginning of a new explosion of wireless technologies currently changing the U.S.

Asian markets such as Korea and Japan are leading the way. China has already reached over 400 million mobile subscribers creating massive opportunities for distributing content and applications.

The impact of wireless technologies and digital media is dramatically changing how content is distributed from music, movies, television, to gaming. Your cell phone, home entertainment center, personal computer, car, home, and kitchen appliances are just a few of your everyday things that will be changing peoples lifestyles.

On September 11, members of the mobile entertainment industry will be meeting in Los Angeles to share ideas, collaborate and partner at the twelfth semi-annual Mobile Entertainment Summit.

A highlight of this Summit is the North American appearance by Mr. Xie Feng, a top executive from China Mobile, China's largest mobile carrier.

"With the growing popularity of wireless games, downloadable ring tones and streaming media, wireless and mobile technology is literally changing the face of entertainment," said Michael Stroud, Founder of iHollywood Forum Inc. and Chair of the Summit. "The fast-adopters and adapters will be the ones who survive and prosper."

The meeting is one day before the world's largest conference focusing on the wireless industry CTIA /Wireless IT & Entertainment 2006.

This year, in addition to hot topics on the explosive growth in wireless entertainment from music downloads to digital cameras and interactive games, the conference...

A high level University of California academic mission to China begins August 24. Dean to post his Blog of China trip

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 23 August 2006

The trip is part of the 10+10 Program, an effort for the University of Californias 10 campuses to partner with 10 prominent Chinese research universities. The goal is to increase research, education and faculty and student exchanges.

The visit was organized by the UC Office of the President. UC President Robert Dynes, UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Henry Yang, UC Merced Provost Keith Alley, UC Chancellor Carol Tomlinson-Keasey, UC Merced Professor Ruth Mostern, and trip blogger Samuel Traina, the acting dean of graduate studies, vice chancellor for research and director of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute are among the delegates.

A group of leading educators from the University of California are on a mission to China. The China trip is part of the 10+10 Program, an effort for the University of Californias 10 campuses to partner with 10 prominent Chinese research universities. The goal is to increase research, education and faculty and student exchanges.

Organized by the UC Office of the President, trip delegates include UC President Robert Dynes, UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Henry Yang, and members of the UC system's newest campus in Merced including its Provost Keith Alley, UC Chancellor Carol Tomlinson-Keasey, UC Merced Professor Ruth Mostern, and Samuel Traina, the acting dean of graduate studies, vice chancellor for research and director of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute.

The 10+10 Program helps further our goals of global interaction and learning, Tomlinson-Keasey said. There are endless partnership possibilities involved with Sichuan University, whether it is working on hydrological issues, solar energy or historical irrigation systems. We are beginning to cement those directions with faculty interactions on specific research projects, and we now have graduate students who can work easily in either culture, helping facilitate that cooperation.

Participants will also celebrate Sichuan Universitys 110th...

How to find a Job in Journalism

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 02 August 2006

Want a job in Journalism? Invaluable tips from Ernest R. Sotomayor, Director of Career Services at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

Prof. Sreenath Sreenivasan, Dean of Students, Columbia Graduate School of Journalism shares an online chat with Ernest R. Sotomayor, Director of Career Services and Assistant Dean of Students Melanie Huff addressing job hunting at the J-school and more.

Ernest Sotomayor, who joined the J-school in Jan. 2005, was a long-time editor at Newsday and served as president of UNITY: Journalists of Color, the most influential organization of minority journalists in the the U.S. A widely respected veteran newspaper professional, his insights and extensive contacts provide Columbia students with an important advantage in their job hunts. He heads a three-person Career Services office.

Sree Sreenivasan: Good afternoon (good morning, good night, etc). Its 1:03 pm, Columbia time. If I or Mr. Sotomayor use at the end of one of our messages, that means theres more to come. If we put a period, we are done, and ready for you

Sree Sreenivasan: This is the fifth such session and we are very excited to have Mr. Ernest Sotomayor join us. He will address various Career Services related questions.

Ernest Sotomayor : Welcome to all of you, on behalf of me and our Deputy Director of Career Services, Julie Hartenstein. Many thanks for your participation.

Some opening thoughts: Your time at Columbia will be enormously fulfilling and is intended to prepare you to launch your career, and for those who have some experience, to accelerate your newsroom abilities, whether in print or broadcasting or online media. While much has been written about the transformation of the news media companies, be assured that there are many opportunties still available for those who will seek them, wherever they are. Among the most important points to make here is that employers will be seeking to hire people who can...

Asian Americans Post Slight Gains in Numbers working in Television News

Posted by AC Team on Thursday, 06 July 2006

Latest report shows more Asian Americans are working in television news, but the numbers still do not reflect the Asian American population in the U.S.

BROADCAST NEWS INDUSTRY STILL HAS A LONG WAY TO GO IN INCREASING JOURNALISTS OF COLOR IN ITS NEWSROOMS

MCLEAN, Va. - UNITY: Journalists of Color is encouraged at the small growth in diversity in television stations but remains extremely concerned about the continuing erosion in the percentage of people of color in radio news.

The annual survey by the Radio and Television News Directors Association and Ball State University released July 6 showed that the percentage of people of color in America's radio newsrooms has plunged by nearly two thirds since 1998, when strict federal equal opportunity rules were scrapped. Local radio newsrooms reported just 6.4 percent of their workers are people of color, down from 16 percent eight years ago.

The news was a bit brighter in local television news, where the proportion of people of color rose one percentage point to 22.2 percent. The percentage of minority news directors in local television also increased, to 13.2 percent from 12 percent last year. Nationwide, the percentage of people of color in the U.S. population is 33.6 percent.

"Apparently, the nation's radio stations just don't get it," said UNITY President Mae Cheng. "As our country grows more diverse, so should the staffs which bring Americans their news. While diversity increased slightly in local television, these numbers show the broadcast industry still has a long way to go before it reflects the diversity of its consumers."

It is imperative that news organizations staffing levels mirror their communities, said Mike Kellogg, President of the Native American Journalists Association. This way of conducting business is the right thing to do and good for business. The survey highlights what is an on-going problem, Native Americans are dismissed from any sort of...