Business Spotlight

Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave

Posted by AC Team - on Friday, 06 January 2012

Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave
If you know Rain, BoA (shown left), and Sistar, then you already know K-Pop, Korea’s contemporary pop music and its artists. K-Pop music is one of the fastest growing music genres in the world, and along with Korea’s popular TV drama serials, films and comic books are a growing source of export revenue for Korea.   The growing global fan base of Korea's entertainment and cultural offerings, known as "Hallyu" or the "Korean Wave" feels more like a tidal wave in some...

Business

Language assistance available for California’s 2006 Primary June 6

Posted by AC Team on Friday, 02 June 2006

Asian American Voters Numbers are Up! Language assistance is available to voters during Californias 2006 Primary Election, Tuesday, June 6. Report by Asian Pacific American Legal Center (APALC) Reports

ASIAN AMERICAN VOTERS NUMBERS ARE UP IN S. CALIFORNIA

LANGUAGE ASSISTANCE FOR JUNE 6 PRIMARY

LOS ANGELES, June 2, 2006 A new report released by the Asian Pacific American Legal Center (APALC) shows that Asian Americans are an increasingly large part of the electorate in both Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

According to Asian Americans at the Ballot Box, a report that details Asian American participation in the 2004 General Election and provides detailed information on Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and
Vietnamese voters.

Asian Americans grew from 8% to 9% of all voters in Los Angeles County and 8% to 13% of all voters in Orange County between the 2000 and 2004 General Elections.

Asian American communities are growing dramatically and were seeing that growth at the polls, said Stewart Kwoh, President and Executive Director of APALC. Increasingly, candidates will have to speak to our issues if they expect to get elected.

According to the report, Asian Americans make up a majority or near majority of voters in Cerritos, Monterey Park, and Rosemead in Los Angeles County and in Westminster in Orange County.

The report also highlights Asian American voters need for the language assistance required under Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act. According to the report, 38% of Chinese, 48% of Korean, and 42% of Vietnamese voters in Los Angeles County used some form of language assistance to vote in the 2004 General Election. In Orange County, 62% of Vietnamese voters used some form of language assistance to vote.

Unless reauthorized by Congress,Section 203 will expire in 2007. Asian American voters clearly both need and use the language assistance provided under Section 203 of the...

Representative Mike Honda Speaks Out on Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Posted by AC Team on Thursday, 01 June 2006

Another Asian Pacific Heritage MonthMay has come and almost gone as quietly as it has arrived. It has been mostly unnoticed by mainstream media, and yet as public servants, this May feels different, for there is a growing political energy, excitement and electricity, for Asian and Pacific Islander Americans (APIAs) across the country.

APIA POLITICAL INVOLVEMENT GROWING NATIONALLY

by Congressman Michael M. Honda

Congressman Honda represents the 15th District of California and serves as the Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee.

"...courageous and promising Asian Americans are running not only in states with traditional APIAs population centers, such as California, New York and Hawaii, but also in states such as Illinois, Ohio, Iowa, Minnesota, Texas, Maryland, and Connecticut."

Another Asian Pacific Heritage MonthMay has come and almost gone as quietly as it has arrived. It has been mostly unnoticed by mainstream media, and yet as public servants, this May feels different, for there is a growing political energy, excitement and electricity, for Asian and Pacific Islander Americans (APIAs) across the country.

Over the past few election cycles, APIAs now numbering almost 14 million nationwide have reached inspiring levels of civic participation in a way that turns heads and quickens heartbeats. According to a recent report released by the Asian American Action Fund that draws on current scholarship, APIAs have lately entered the political process as candidates, office holders, contributors, and voters in unprecedented numbers. In other words, APIAs are raising the level of public debate as candidates and officials, raising money as contributors, and raising their hands to be counted as voters.

There is truly electricity out there: For example, for the first time in Californias history, APIA candidates have a strong chance of winning at all levels of state governmenta record four Asian Americans are...

What would you do differently?

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 18 January 2006

What would you do differently this year? To know the answer to that question, we need a perspective on what happened in the previous year. What did we do that we are happy and satisfied with? What did we do that we are less than proud of? What would we do differently if we had the chance?

Another new year. 2006 is here, and the Chinese year of the Fire Dog, 4703 is about to start. This time of the year, numerous well meaning resolutions are being made, and almost as many are rapidly being forgotten.

A nagging question lingers in the mind for many whether you celebrate the New Year or not: What would you do differently this year? To know the answer to that question, we need a perspective on what happened in the previous year. What did we do that we are happy and satisfied with? What did we do that we are less than proud of? What would we do differently if we had the chance?

An acquaintance of mine, John was diagnosed with a terminal illness; he was given six months to live. He grieved and anguished with his family and loved ones and then went about getting his affairs in order and to say his goodbyes. On a last ditch effort with one more month to live, he saw another specialist. It turned out it was a misdiagnosis and he wasnt going to die after all!

Not surprising Johns whole attitude towards life changed. He reflected on his life as he has lived it so far and reevaluated his priorities. He decided to reduce his hours spent on his business and took that time to spend with his family and to volunteer at the local Big Brother program. He decided that his life mission was to make a difference to the people that he came in contact with. He felt that it was more important to him than the wealth, prestige and physical comforts he could provide.

What happened next is truly the even more remarkable part of the story. First, his business is thriving even more than before! How can that be? He smiled ruefully and said that he was...

Tsunami Aid Distributed Unevenly Between India's Fishing and Farming Villages

Posted by AC Team on Sunday, 25 December 2005

Tsunami Aid Distributed Unevenly Between India's Fishing and Farming Villages

By Ken Moritsugu
December 7, 2005

THARANGAMBADI, India - From fishermen cleaning nets to women sorting fish, the tsunami-hit shoreline of this town in south India bustles with activity. More than 300 fishing boats, brightly painted with the names of donors, blanket the beach.

A mile away, the scene couldn't be more different. Only minimal aid has reached the dusty, almost abandoned village of Pudupalayam. Residents have struggled to eke out a living since salt from the tsunami spoiled the fields where they worked as laborers.

Nearly a year after the tsunami raced across the Indian Ocean, bringing devastation to 13 countries and killing an estimated 225,000 people, international aid agencies have relearned a bitter lesson: Not everyone can be helped equally.

What's happened here also has happened elsewhere: Those who already were relatively well off are doing better with assistance from international donors, while those who were struggling before the tsunami often still are struggling.

Former President Clinton, meeting privately with aid groups last month as the United Nations special envoy for tsunami recovery, underscored the importance of reaching the region's poorest. "A successful reconstruction effort should ensure the protection of vulnerable populations," he was quoted as saying in a U.N. news release.

"The hope is that at the end of it, there's a better infrastructure, there's a more equitable social pattern," said Steve Hollingworth, the India director for CARE, a development agency that's active in the reconstruction.

"But the fact of the matter is that an emergency like this is an opportunity for some over and above others, and it makes vulnerable groups much more vulnerable than they were before," he said. "There's no way around it."

The plight of villages such as Pudupalayam (pronounced...

AALDEF Provides Free Legal Advice to Southeast/Asian Communities Facing Deportation

Posted by Lia Chang on Wednesday, 02 March 2005

AALDEF Provides Free Legal Advice to Southeast/Asian Communities Facing Deportation

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) is partnering with community-based organizations in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Philadelphia to provide free legal-advice about these new federal regulations that may benefit former green cardholders placed in deportation as a result of a criminal conviction. Attorneys will provide legal advice, by appointment only, at the following locations:

Providence, Rhode Island
Mar. 6, 1pm-4pm
Providence Youth Student Movement
807 Broad Street, 3rd Fl.
Providence, RI 02907

Lowell, Massachusetts
Mar. 14, 3pm-8pm
Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association
165 Jackson Street, Lowell, MA 01852

Providence, Rhode Island
Mar. 26, 1pm-4pm
Providence Youth Student Movement
807 Broad Street, 3rd Fl.
Providence, RI 02907

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Apr. 1, 3pm-8pm
Cambodian Association of Greater Philadelphia
5412 North 5 St.
Philadelphia, PA 19120

To apply under the new regulations, you must meet these requirements;
(1) you were a green card holder until you received a final order of deportation or removal
(2) you had the green card for at least 7 consecutive years prior to the date of your final order of deportation
(3) you pled guilty or no contest to a criminal case where the plea was made before Apr. 1, 1997
(4) you were eligible to apply for section 212(c) (deportation waiver) relief at the time the plea was made.

Call AALDEF at 800-966-5946 x 213 to schedule an appointment; obtain free legal advice for former green card holders with old deportation orders. Individuals seeking legal advice must call to set up confidential meetings with an AALDEF staff attorney. Individuals must bring the following documents in order to receive proper legal advice: copy of notice to...