Lifestyle Spotlight

First Lady Michelle Obama wears Jason Wu's gown to the Ball

Posted by AC Team - on Tuesday, 22 January 2013

First Lady Michelle Obama wears Jason Wu's gown to the Ball
January 22, 2013 Washington D.C. by AC Team staff If you are as talented as designer Jason Wu, lightning can indeed strike twice to your career. First Lady Michelle Obama arrived to the Commander-in-Chief inaugural ball last night wearing his stunning ruby red gown, marking the second inaugural she chose to wear one of his creations. From the homepage click here to view Jason Wu's full length inaugural gown. In 2009, at the first inaugural she surprised fashinistas by...

Lifestyle

Remembering the I-Hotel Struggle

Posted by AC Team on Tuesday, 12 May 2009

With the passing of Filipino-American poet and activist Al Robles who was active in the San Francisco I-Hotel struggle, AC Team searched the web to bring you more about this historic fight.

Jennifer Low of SFGTV hosts Part 1 CELEBRATE HERITAGE. CELEBRATE UNITY about the struggle for Filipino residents to save the San Francisco I-Hotel in the 1970s.

This APA Heritage Month segment posted on YouTube.com was produced in 2007 by Rich Bartlebaugh and Marisa Louie with historical footage contributed by filmmaker Curtis Choy.


With the passing of Filipino-American poet and activist Al Robles who was active in the San Francisco I-Hotel struggle, AC Team searched the web to bring you more about this historic fight.


Jennifer Low of SFGTV hosts Part 1 CELEBRATE HERITAGE. CELEBRATE UNITY about the struggle for Filipino residents to save the San Francisco I-Hotel in the 1970s.

This SFGTV segment posted on YouTube.com was produced in 2007 by Rich Bartlebaugh and Marisa Louie.

Interviews include Emil De Guzman, Board President of the Manilatown Heritage Foundation which rebuilt the I-Hotel in 2005, featuring historical footage provided by filmmaker Curtis Choy.

For Al Robles memorial services information click here.

For more information on filmmaker Curtis Choy's films click here.

To view the SFGTV feature, click on the YouTube.com screen below:

Poet & Activist Al Robles 1930 - 2009 Memorials May 15 and May 17 in San Francisco

Posted by Suzanne Kai on Monday, 11 May 2009

Poet, writer and community advocate Al Robles passed away May 2, 2009 at the age of 79

He leaves behind a lifetime of work helping the poor, the elderly, his community, and a legacy that will be honored by generations to come.

Robles was involved in the International Hotel struggle in San Francisco in the 70's.

In 1977, the decade long fight would result in the eviction of many elderly, low-income Filipino Americans, dismantling the last enclave of San Francisco's historic Manilatown - a day of reckoning for Filipino-American civil rights history.

Robles, affectionately called Manong Al, never gave up helping his community. The I-Hotel was rebuilt in 2005 by the Manilatown Heritage Foundation.

Memorial Services to celebrate Al Robles Life and Journey are planned in San Francisco May 15 and May 17 - see article for details.

Poet, writer and community advocate Al Robles passed away May 2, 2009 at the age of 79.

He leaves behind a lifetime of work helping the poor, the elderly, and his community.

Robles was involved in the International Hotel struggle in San Francisco in the 70's, which would become a day of reckoning for Filipino-American civil rights history.

In 1977, the I-Hotel tenants, primarily elderly low-income Filipinos, lost their decade long struggle and were evicted.

With their eviction, the last enclave of San Francisco's historic Manilatown community and all of its rich cultural living-history was dismantled.

After twenty years of protest by the community at large, the I-Hotel was rebuilt in 2005 through the Manilatown Heritage Association.

Robles, a kind-hearted soul, affectionately called Manong Al, never gave up. He leaves behind a lifetime of work and a legacy that will be honored by generations to come.

- Suzanne Joe Kai

Note from the editor: I remember vividly covering the I-Hotel struggle when I was a young television news reporter just...

Port of Entry: The Angel Island Immigration Station

Posted by Lia Chang on Tuesday, 21 April 2009

Inside the Angel Island Immigration Station

The U.S. Immigration Station on Angel Island, which has been on the annual list of America's 11 Most Endangered Places since 1999, re-opened after more than three years of restoration and preservation work on February 15, 2009. The Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (AIISF), the nonprofit partner of California State Parks and the National Park Service, along with Save America's Treasures and American Express Partners in Preservation, two of the National Trust for Historic Preservation's valued partnerships, contributed
much-needed funding in the efforts to preserve, restore and interpret the historic immigration station, which is now open to the public for tours.

In recognition of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am sharing this article I wrote about my grandmother's experience being detained at Angel Island, which appeared online in the September 19, 2000 edition of A. Media, Inc.

"My name is Lee Bak Huen. In 1937, I was 15 years old when Japan bombed China and many of the people in my grandmother's village were killed. At the time, my father, brother and two sisters lived in Locke, Ca, and my father sold clothes to farmers to support us. Fearing for my life, he sent my passport and a booklet that detailed everything about my family and my home for me to study. He managed to scrape together $300 Hong Kong dollars, enough for third class passage on the SS President Hoover. My journey from Hong Kong to San Francisco took 18 days. I slept on a hammock and was seasick the entire time.

I expected to get off the ship in San Francisco, but was taken to Angel Island instead, and detained. My father hired a lawyer to facilitate the processing. The Chinese interpreter who interrogated me was so rude that she confused me with many questions. I was asked how many stones it took to build my house in China, how many sisters I had, the year I was born, why didn't I come with my...

Bargain Shoppers Flock to Store Liquidations

Posted by AC Team on Monday, 02 March 2009

Young Andrew Do keeps an eye on his bargains at the Circuit City store liquidation in Newport Beach, California. Circuit City is in its last week of liquidation before its doors close nationwide.

Andrew Do is one happy little boy as he goes home today with fun games to play with.

Notice he is sitting in the middle of a pile of items his family has collected, and his arm is hanging on to the big box with the Guitar Hero video game.

His family was shopping Sunday at the Circuit City store liquidation sale in Newport Beach, California.

A large sign posted says there are only eight more days to go before the store closes.

Discounts increased today to up to 70 percent off.

DVDs, televisions, cameras and computers were flying out the door.

One Chinese-American Woman Fights Advanced Lung Cancer

Posted by AC Team on Thursday, 20 November 2008

One Chinese-American Woman Fights Advanced Lung Cancer

November is Lung Awareness Month. According to a study by the Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training, the Chinese-American population has the highest death rates for lung and bronchial cancer among all Asian-American groups. The number one cause of cancer death in the United States, lung cancer will kill more Americans this year than breast, prostate, colon, and liver cancers combined.

Lung cancer patient, Ellen Chung, refuses to let these statistics affect her positive outlook on life. Chung was diagnosed with Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in December of 2002. She never smoked and her only symptoms were some indigestion and pain in her left chest and shoulder.

Resiliency is not a new concept for Chung. Born in Hawaii, her father worked in a sugar cane field, and she was fifth of six children. She worked two jobs to make her dream of moving to New York City after high school come true. Chung has since moved to four different cities, had four children, returned to college in her 30's, and is now retired and enjoying life as a grandmother.

"My first oncologist gave me nine months to live and said the only effective treatment option was chemotherapy, which may or may not give me more time - I decided to try another oncologist," Chung said.

According to Chung's current oncologist, Dr. Nick Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Seattle Cancer Treatment and Wellness Center, there are currently four standard treatments for lung cancer - surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapies.

Chung's Stage IV cancer initially responded well to chemotherapy, but eventually the cancer returned. When Tarceva (erlotinib) was approved, Dr. Chen recommended this treatment for Chung.

"Now, almost six years later, I take a pill once-a-day called Tarceva, which allows me to continue living my life," Chung said.

"In recent years there have...