Lifestyle Spotlight

Feeling Stressed, and Wanting More Time? By Marilyn Tam “How did it get so late so soon?” - Dr. Seuss

Posted by Marilyn Tam - on Thursday, 22 November 2012

Feeling Stressed, and Wanting More Time?  By Marilyn Tam  “How did it get so late so soon?” - Dr. Seuss
Feeling Stressed, and Wanting More Time? By Marilyn Tam  “How did it get so late so soon?” - Dr. Seuss “It’s November already, where did the year go?” “The holidays are coming, and I’m still caught up in projects that I started months ago.” “Get all my work done? If I had 48 hours in a day I may get caught up in another year. Do you relate? Occasionally or more often, everyone has felt that time was rushing by, carrying with it our chances...

Lifestyle

Asian American Reality Stars Join Over 300 People to Get Tested and Vaccinated for Hepatitis B at the 3rd Annual Asian Heritage Street Celebration

Posted by AC Team on Tuesday, 22 May 2007

Free hepatitis B screenings and vaccinations were provided by the Asian Liver Center of Stanford University

San Francisco, CA (May 22, 2007) - Yul Kwon, winner of CBS's Survivor: Cook Islands (and new CNN correspondent) along with the Cho Brothers of CBS's Amazing Race 10 , Miss San Jose 2007 Nicole Fox, San Francisco Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting, and members of the media were tested and vaccinated for hepatitis B during the Asian Heritage Street Celebration (AHSC) in San Francisco's SOMA district at 1025 Howard Street on Saturday, May 19th, 2007. The Asian Liver Center at Stanford University provided free hepatitis B screenings and vaccinations were available for $20 per shot.

These screenings and vaccinations are a major step for San Francisco Hep B Free, a two-year-long campaign for the city to become the first in the nation to screen, vaccinate, and treat all Asian Pacific American (APA) residents for Hepatitis B (HBV).

"SF Hep B Free is an extraordinary campaign with a message for all APAs," said Erwin Cho, Amazing Race 10. "Simply by getting the word out about how widespread hepatitis B is, and then encouraging people to get tested and vaccinated, we will be one step closer to eliminating this disease."

"Awareness of the hepatitis B campaign is critical to the health and well-being of all Asians," said Yul Kwon, Survivor: Cook Islands. "I am proud to be involved in this very important issue in the APA community."

San Francisco's APA residents comprise of 34% of the city's population and bear a disproportionate burden of many undetected HBV infections and the highest liver cancer rate in the nation. While about 1 in 1,000 of the general US population has chronic HBV infection, 1 in 10 people in the API community are potentially living with an undiagnosed infection. APIs are 100 times more likely to suffer from chronic HBV infection and four times more likely to die from liver cancer compared with the general...

Asian American Reality TV Hunks Take Off Their Shirts for the San Francisco Hep B Free Campaign

Posted by AC Team on Thursday, 17 May 2007

Free Hepatitis B Screenings by Asian Liver Center at Stanford University during the Asian Heritage Street Celebration on May 19th, 2007

San Francisco, CA (May 17, 2007)- Yul Kwon, winner of CBS's Survivor: Cook Islands (and new CNN correspondent) along with the Cho Brothers of CBS's Amazing Race 10 will be screened for hepatitis B during the Asian Heritage Street Celebration (AHSC) in San Francisco's SOMA district at 1025 Howard Street on Saturday, May 19th, 2007. The Asian Liver Center at Stanford University will provide free hepatitis B screenings and vaccinations will be available at $20 per shot while supplies last.

These screenings and vaccinations are a major step for San Francisco Hep B Free, a two-year-long campaign for the city to become the first in the nation to screen, vaccinate, and treat all Asian Pacific American (APA) residents for Hepatitis B (HBV).

San Francisco's APA residents comprise of 34% of the city's population and bear a disproportionate burden of many undetected HBV infections and the highest liver cancer rate in the nation. While about 1 in 1,000 of the general US population has chronic HBV infection, 1 in 10 people in the API community are potentially living with an undiagnosed infection. APIs are 100 times more likely to suffer from chronic HBV infection and four times more likely to die from liver cancer compared with the general population.

"There are an estimated 25,000 APAs living in the city of San Francisco with chronic hepatitis B, and an additional 100,000 who are unprotected," said Dr. Samuel So, Director, Asian Liver Center at Stanford University. "There's a real need for increased hepatitis B testing and vaccination in the APA community. More than half of the deaths from hepatitis B are from our community, yet the seriousness of this disease is under-appreciated, under-diagnosed, and under-treated. We are grateful for everyone's support in promoting awareness and prevention of this silent...

What's in Store for the Year of the Fire Boar?

Posted by Angi Ma Wong on Tuesday, 30 January 2007

It's the Year of the Fire Boar. What''s in store for you?

The year of the Fire Boar begins on February 18, 2007. The predictions for each lunar year, is calculated by the relationships of the five elements and how they relate to each other during the reign of the zodiac animal of the year.

The Year 4705 of Boar reveals that the two elements in place are fire on top of water. In the relationship of these two elements, it is one of conflict as water will extinguish fire, thus destroying it, portending international disharmony, tension and conflicts. But the Boar is of the water element, which gives birth to the wood element, representing germination that results in new life and beginnings so there is the possibility of new relationships and partnerships, traveling which will stimulate tourism and moving.

The Boar is the symbol of prosperity of industries that are governed by the element of earth such as property, mining, hotel, chemicals, insurance and those of the metal element including machinery, computer, high tech industries, skincare and health-related businesses. Wood-related businesses such as textiles, fashion, books, publications, paper, forestry, and furniture will continue to prosper as they did in 2006, but not as strongly.

The prospects are less optimistic for water and fire-related businesses and industries such as shipping, communication, drinks, stocks, finance, energy, electricity, entertainment, and airlines.

Health challenges encountered this year will be related to high blood pressure, heart burn, inflammation, diabetes, and kidney problems. Take recommended dosages of antioxidants, omega 3 oil or COQ10 and drink green tea.

AALDEF Election Protection PLAN for 2006 Midterm Elections IN PLACE

Posted by AC Team on Monday, 06 November 2006

Multilingual Asian American exit poll survey expands in eight states, to document voters' experiences and choices in key congressional and state races.

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), a 32-year-old civil rights group, today announced details of its Election Protection 2006 efforts on Election Day. Tomorrow, more than 620 attorneys, law students, and volunteers will cover more than 60 poll sites in eight states and Washington, D.C., with a focus on precincts where Asian language assistance is provided, where Asian American voter registration has increased, or where Asian American voters historically have experienced intimidation.

AALDEF will document incidents of voter discrimination at poll sites, receive reports via its toll-free hotline, 800.966.5946 and via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. document.getElementById('cloakdb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7').innerHTML = ''; var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addydb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7 = 'votingcomplaints' + '@'; addydb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7 = addydb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7 + 'aaldef' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_textdb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7 = 'votingcomplaints' + '@' + 'aaldef' + '.' + 'org';document.getElementById('cloakdb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7').innerHTML += ''+addy_textdb79cd740635530f86499fa7f975e0f7+''; , and conduct a multilingual exit poll of Asian American voters in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

Said AALDEF executive director Margaret Fung, In recent elections, Asian Americans have continued to face barriers that impede their right to vote. With the dramatic increase in new citizens and first-time...

Remembering Betty: The Voice of Flight 11

Posted by AC Team on Tuesday, 12 September 2006

Remembering Betty: The Voice of Flight 11

by Lynda Lin, September 11, 2006

Pacific Citizen, a member of New America Media
http://www.newamericamedia.org/

Editor's Note: Betty Ong, a flight attendent on United Flight 11, has been called an unsung hero for her 23-minute phone conversation relaying vital information that later allowed the FBI to identify the terrorists including purported ringleader Mohammed Atta. But the public has been fickle with Betty's memory.

Sept. 11, 2006

Pacific Citizen News Feature

by Linda Lin

NAM Editor's Note: Betty Ong, a flight attendent on United Flight 11, has been called an unsung hero for her 23-minute phone conversation relaying vital information that later allowed the FBI to identify the terrorists including purported ringleader Mohammed Atta. But the public has been fickle with Betty's memory.

How do you heal a wound? Each time this year, the suture seems to bleed a bit and some commemorate the loss in the same way America has traditionally honored presidents: renaming streets, schools and public buildings. On the East Coast, a post office named Todd Beamer reminds its patrons of the exhortation, "Let's roll." And for the new school year in San Jose, Calif. students pass through the threshold of Capt. Jason M. Dahl Elementary School, the pilot of United Flight 93 whose untimely death has recently been immortalized in a Hollywood movie.

But who remembers the young woman with the calm voice telling American Airlines officials the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, about the hijackers' seat numbers and the choking presence of mace? In the recording of the telephone conversation, she says "Okay, my name is Betty Ong. I'm number three on Flight 11."

In pictures her smile is soft and haunting, but is she fading from our memory?

"I know the Asian community is aware of Betty. I can't gauge who Betty is to them," said Cathie Ong-Herrera, Betty's older...