Editor's Choice

The Next Generation: Leadership in Asian Affairs Fellowship

Posted by AC Team on Sunday, 31 December 2006

National Bureau of Asian Research Announces "The Next Generation: Leadership in Asian Affairs" Fellowship for Graduate Students

SEATTLE-- (U.S. ASIAN WIRE)-- The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) is pleased to announce The Next Generation: Leadership in Asian Affairs fellowship for 2007-2008, a post-master's degree program that is cultivating a new generation of Asia affairs specialists committed to and capable of bridging the gap between the best scholarly research and the pressing needs of American foreign policy toward a rapidly changing Asia.
NBR invites recent master's and professional degree holders (e.g., MA, MBA, LLM, JD, etc.) to apply for a year-long fellowship at NBRs headquarters in Seattle to collaborate with leading scholars to publish research, and to participate in the briefing of research findings to the policymaking community in Washington, D.C.

This one-year fellowship is designed to further the professional development of Asia specialists in the year just after the completion of their master's degree. Successful applicants will gain further knowledge of Asia and an understanding of the U.S. foreign policymaking process through the following: conducting research under the guidance of an NBR program director; collaborating with senior scholars on academic publications; and traveling to Washington, D.C. to participate in the briefing of research findings to relevant constituents within the policy community.
The application deadline is January 15,...

Emails Reveal Deep Seated Anger and Fear in Asian Immigrant Community

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 12 May 2010

Renowned journalist and author William Wong posted two blogs about the recent Black-on-Chinese-street-crime in Oakland and San Francisco, and has received a lot of response, some of it nasty.

The Black-on-Chinese-street-crime story in Oakland and San Francisco has generated a lot of heat, anger, fear, frustration, and searches for solutions.

Renowned journalist and author William Wong posted two blogs, and has received a lot of response, some of it nasty.

Click here for the full commentary.

Black-Asian Divide: Lessons from History

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 19 May 2010

Renowned journalist and author William Wong shares historical context about the recent black-on-Chinese-street-crime story in Oakland and San Francisco.


The Black on Chinese street crime story in Oakland and San Francisco has generated a lot of heat, anger, fear, frustration, and searches for solutions.

Renowned journalist and author William Wong is blogging about this, and has received a lot of response, some of it nasty.

In his latest commentary, Wong explores some historical context to this bewildering subject.

Click here for the full commentary.

Click here for William Wong's previous blog posts.

AAJA Calls for End to AsianWeek's Racist Column

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 28 February 2007

AAJA Calls for End to AsianWeek's Racist Column

While the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) supports freedom of the press, AAJA believes that all media regardless of size should practice the highest standards of journalism including in matters of ethnicity, race and diversity.

AsianWeek, a nationally distributed English-language newspaper, ran in its Feb. 23 issue "Why I Hate Blacks," a column by Kenneth Eng. AAJA views the decision to publish this piece as irresponsible journalism.

AAJA is committed to diversity and believes in fair and accurate coverage of all communities. AAJA is in its 13th year as an alliance partner in UNITY Journalists of Color, along with the National Association of Black Journalists, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Organizations representing Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders across the country immediately expressed outrage over the column and issued public statements criticizing AsianWeek. The Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans, Asian American Justice Center, Equal Justice Society and other groups are sponsoring a petition calling for AsianWeek "to take immediate action and issue an unequivocal apology, terminate their relationship with Kenneth Eng, print an editorial debunking the column and setting the record straight, review their editorial policy and process, and hold those responsible accountable."

The AAJA National Office has chosen not to quote from or reprint any...

No Easy Solutions to Black-Asian Tensions

Posted by AC Team on Tuesday, 25 May 2010

Renowned journalist William Wong explores solutions to curbing the Black-Asian street crimes in Oakland & SF in this third of a three part series.


The Black-on-Chinese-street-crime story in Oakland and San Francisco has generated a lot of heat, anger, fear, frustration, and searches for solutions.

In this third of a three part series, renowned journalist and author William Wong explores solutions to curbing the racially-tinged street crimes.

Click here for the full commentary.

Click here for William Wong's previous blog posts.